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collage

Last week Charity and I finished our diy coffee table ottoman project. I use the word “our” loosely as it was really her project that I helped with. She had seen an idea for one on Pinterest (shocking I know) and asked if I’d help her with and of course I said yes.

She acquired this really worn out well used coffee table for free so it was just a matter of painting and covering the top.

it's just begging to be made beautiful

it’s just begging to be made beautiful

We didn’t really want to sand the table especially since the only part that was going to show was the legs. When we were out shopping for supplies we found a spray paint that mimics a textured stone finish. It was a great color brown to go with Charity’s animal safari type theme so we went with it. We took it outside, turned it upside down, and painted the legs and sides. We did end up using a clear sealer on top just to protect the paint.

This is the paint we used

This is the paint we used

While we waited for the paint to dry, we got to work on the ottoman cover. Before painting the table we measured and traced the top so we knew how large our piece of foam needed to be. Once we had traced around the top, we cut the foam to size.

We found it easiest to turn the table upside down on top of the foam to trace around the edge of the table.

We found it easiest to turn the table upside down on top of the foam to trace around the edge of the table.

I recommend using really sharp scissors of if you have them, the electric kind. Foam is hard to cut!

I recommend using really sharp scissors of if you have them, the electric kind. Foam is hard to cut!

Charity had decided that she wanted to tuft the ottoman with fabric covered buttons. We got the button kit from Wal-Mart but due to the size of the table we ended up needing to get 3 sets to have enough buttons. I was worried that covering the buttons would be difficult but it actually wasn’t too bad. You do need to make sure that you pull your fabric tight though before pressing the back piece on or else you end up with wrinkles in your buttons. We used the same fabric that we were planning to use for the top to cover the buttons.

These are the button kits.

These are the button kits.

We used a compass to measure out circles on our fabric that measured twice the diameter of the button we were covering.

We used a compass to measure out circles on our fabric that measured twice the diameter of the button we were covering.

This is what all of the steps to covering the buttons look like put in order.

This is what all of the steps to covering the buttons look like put in order.

Place your fabric circle inside the button cover.

Place your fabric circle inside the button cover.

Then put the button top inside the button maker. We ended up trimming off quite a bit of excess fabric in this step. Make sure to pull your fabric tight before continuing to the next step.

Then put the button top inside the button maker. We ended up trimming off quite a bit of excess fabric in this step. Make sure to pull your fabric tight before continuing to the next step.

Fold down the excess fabric after you pull it tight. Then add the button back.

Fold down the excess fabric after you pull it tight. Then add the button back.

Use the blue piece of the button kit to push the back on. It will click into place.

Use the blue piece of the button kit to push the back on. It will click into place.

Remove the blue piece and pop out your button.

Remove the blue piece and pop out your button.

We made a total of 8 buttons so we just repeated the above steps until all of the buttons were finished. After the buttons were finished we had to sew them on. Since we’re making the ottoman out of a coffee table and we can’t actually tuft through the top of the table without drilling holes, we opted to tuft the top before putting it on the table. We stretched our fabric over the foam we cut earlier and then measured and placed the buttons where we wanted them. We used a black marker to make dots where the buttons needed to go so we would be sure we sewed them in the right place. Instead of trying to explain the method we used, I’m going to link the video I watched that showed us how to do it. We used the same method with the exception of the fabric used on the underside. In the video she uses muslin and we used felt because that is what we had on hand. We also tufted our top before it was put on the ottoman and in the video she does it at the end. Be sure to watch the video below!

This is what the underside of ours looked like as we started tufting each button.

This is what the underside of ours looked like as we started tufting each button.

Close up of the top after the button was secured in place.

Close up of the top after the button was secured in place.

After all of the buttons were sewn on and our paint was dry on the table, we were ready to adhere the foam/fabric to the top. We used Elmer’s spray glue and sprayed the top of the table so that once we placed the foam on top, it would stay in place while we stapled down the fabric.

Got this glue at Wal-Mart for about $6 and had plenty left for another project.

Got this glue at Wal-Mart for about $6 and had plenty left for another project.

Our foam is now glued to the table top

Our foam is now glued to the table top

Once our foam was glued down we were ready to start stapling the fabric. We flipped the table upside down making sure we pulled the fabric tight and smooth so there wouldn’t be any wrinkles once we started stapling. We used a hand staple gun and worked our way from the middle all the way around to the ends of the table pulling the fabric tight as we worked. Once you start reaching an end piece be sure you’re not pulling your fabric tight at a diagonal or else it causes buckling in the fabric.

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Once we had stapled the fabric all the way around the underside of the table, we trimmed the excess fabric. You don’t want your fabric to hang down and be visible once you flip the table so we trimmed very close to the staple line. After we finished trimming the fabric, our project was finished. We flipped it over and were very pleased with our first diy ottoman project!

Tah-dah!

Tah-dah!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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